8 Lessons I've Learned from Writing 1000+ Blog Posts

According to Contently, a site that aggregates the latest content by freelance authors, I've written a little over 1.5 million words across over 1,000 blog posts on over 50 publications that have generated 700k social shares.

Those numbers, of course, does not include content I've ghostwritten.

It's just blog posts with my byline.

So I think I'm in pretty good standing to give you some advice...

(See how to find your niche for blogging)

 

What You'll Learn

In this post, I want to share with you some of the top lessons I have learned through blogging almost daily over the past seven years. In particular, you'll learn.

  • What you must have to write consistently about your niche and what happens if you don't have it.
  • How to get inspiration for your blog posts so you don't run out of ideas to write about.
  • The painful truth about creating "unique" content and what you should focus on instead.
  • Why your best blog posts aren't getting traffic, and how to fix it.
  • How to identify and beat different manifestations of writer's block.

 

1. You Must Love What You Write About.

If you plan on embarking upon an epic blogging journey in a specific niche, you must love it. You must be passionate about it. It should be something that you really can't shut up about.

It's that kind of excitement that will help ensure that you don't get burnt out of writing about your niche over and over and over again.

It's that kind of excitement that will lead you to opportunities beyond blogging such as getting interviewed about your niche, speaking about your niche, educating people about your niche, and much more.

If you don't love your subject that much, be prepared to either hire someone who is passionate about it down the road to do your blogging for you or to eventually move on to a new niche.

 

(P.S. If you'd like to download a free checklist of 31 blog traffic secrets click here or the image below)

 

2. Reading Is A Requirement For Writing.

This is another reason you must love your niche. You have to read in order to write.

To keep up with my own niche, I use Feedly to subscribe to hundreds of blogs. Of course, I can't read every single article, but I can check out the headlines to determine whether there is big news that I need to be aware of.

 

reading-for-writing-inspiration

 

Reading will keep you up to date on the latest news in your niche so you don't write something that is outdated. Reading will also keep up your inspiration level for generating great blog post ideas. Speaking of great topics...

 

 

3. Almost Everything Has Already Been Written About.

If you're looking for a niche where you can be the first to write a unique piece of content that has never been written about before, good luck.

There are over 117 billion blog posts on Tumblr.

WordPress.com users publish over 41 million blog posts per month.

If you search for websites with blog subdomains, there are over 16 million results.

If you search for Blogspot blogs, there are over 245 million results.

What does that tell you? There's a good chance that almost every great idea you think about has been covered in a blog post. Likely many of them.

You can't be discouraged by this fact. You should be motivated by it instead.

Your goal isn't to write about something no one has ever written about before, although if you find that topic, good for you.

Your goal is to write about it better. Your goal is to write the best post about that topic.

If you focus on writing the most up to date, accurate, and thorough blog post, you will create amazing content each and every time you blog.

 

4. Writing Great Blog Posts Takes More Time Than You Think.

You might have read blog posts about how you can write 1,500 words in half an hour if you put your mind to it. And if you can, that's awesome.

But if you can't, that's not a bad thing, or a sign that you shouldn't be blogging in the first place.

I can tell you that some days, I can blast out six blog posts. On others, I might get half of one post done.

The time it takes to write a blog post will depend a variety of factors. What the topic is about. How long you want the post to be. How much research you have to do. How many images you have to find or create.

Sometimes, it just depends on how you're feeling on a particular day. You might be having a great writing day or a slow writing day.

If you're not sure how long it takes you to write blog posts, and you're curious, start writing your posts in Google Docs. Then use your Revision History to see the timeline.

 

how-long-it-takes-write-a-post

 

While you should strive to write faster and increase your productivity, you shouldn't do it if it sacrifices the quality of your writing or sucks the passion out of your blogging experience.

It's more satisfying to spend a day writing the best blog post every than to crank out posts that you're not enthusiastic to publish.

 

 

5. If You're Struggling With Something, Write About It.

If you're having a problem with something related to your niche, then there's a good chance that someone out there has had that problem as well. More people will likely have the same problem in the future.

Therefore, your blog post about the problem and how you handled it will become a great reference for future people struggling with the same issue.

That makes for great topic inspiration and highly valuable content.

 

6. Even Your Greatest Content Has To Be Promoted.

If you want your blog post to be the best, you can't just write awesome content and expect it people to find it on their own. You have to promote it.

This applies to everyone, from small blog owners to contributors to major online publications. Even if every post on Mashable gets a thousand tweets, there is still that one post that gets five thousand tweets and blows the rest out of the water.

You want your post to be that one on every site you write for, including your own. Each post should be better than the rest.

You can try tools like Impactana to see how your posts fare in terms of both social sharing, links, views, and much more.

 

 

content-promotion-results

 

This way, you know how your content performs beyond the vanity metrics like tweets and likes.

Remember that no matter what your blogging goals are, promotion leads to traffic, and traffic is what will help you achieve those goals.

Every monetization method you use: advertising, affiliate marketing, course creation, product sales, service sales, etc. depends on traffic.

The more you promote your content, the more traffic you get, and the more of your blogging goals you will achieve.

 

7. Guest Blogging Still Works.

I not saying that what Google has to say doesn't matter, because it does, and you pay attention if you want to stay on Google's good side.

I will say that despite them making a lot of people think guest blogging doesn't work anymore, it still does. Not for crappy link building, but for quality link building with quality content.

If you want more exposure for yourself, more traffic to your blog, and to build more authority in your niche, guest blogging is the way to do it. It allows you to get in front of new audiences and build your credibility and reputation as someone who knows their stuff.

Along the way, you'll even build some great links if you are submitting to quality publications.

Quality equals blogs that get traffic, that have subscribers, that receive engagement (comments), and that get shared by their readers on social media.

Quality does not equal blogs with a high PageRank, zero comments, zero social shares, and random backlinks in posts that you would never read for informational purposes.

 

8. Writer's Block Isn't Always What You Think It Is.

Most people envision writer's block as staring at a blank screen for hours, waiting for inspiration to write to arrive, but it never does. And that is what most writers block looks like. But not all of it.

Sometimes, it comes in the form of procrastination.

Instead of sitting down to write something, you do a dozen other tasks at your desk or elsewhere. Or instead of writing, you watch a string of YouTube videos.

 

writers-block

 

Effectively, it's writer's block in the form of avoidance.

Other times, it comes in the form of starting blog posts, but not finishing them. I can't tell you how many drafts I have that sometimes go unfinished for weeks.

Writer's block in this instance doesn't stop me from starting. It stops me from finishing.

The best way to beat writer's block in any form is to write something. If you can't start or finish the thing you need to start writing, write something else.

It doesn't have to be a blog post. It can be an email. A blog comment. A forum comment. An answer to a question on Quora.

Just get yourself in the flow of writing. Once you start getting words out of your fingers and onto your computer, that blog post you couldn't start or finish will take shape.

 

(P.S. If you'd like to download a free checklist of 31 blog traffic secrets click here or the image below)

 

 

In Conclusion

I hope that some of the things I have learned in my blogging journey will help you become successful in yours.

What lessons have you learned through blogging?

Please share in the comments!

Kristi Hines

Comments (29)

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  1. Hello Kristi,
    Welcome to Niche Hacks once again. You always have lots of useful information to share with us here and this one is really brilliant :).

    As a writer, there is no way you'll succeed if you do not love what you writes about. There is simply no two ways about it because for someone to like your articles, it must be appealing to you first. Its just like the saying that "You must love yourself first before other people can love you" and that is so true when it comes to writing as well. If you don't love it then, there is 90% chance that your audience will not love it too.

    In the same vein, i agree with your point that writers are also readers. There is no other better way of gaining knowledge and more information other than through reading. If you're not a good reader then, there is absolutely no way you can succeed as a writer so if you must become a successful writer, you must first of all form a habit of reading. Not just a particular subject, you must learn to read any subject that comes your way.

    This is really good Kristi.

    Thanks for being awesome :).

  2. Ann Smarty says:

    Congrats on the huge accomplishment, Kristi! People keep asking me how many article I wrote and I have no clue 🙂

    Agreed on all the points: Loved reading the article!

    • Kristi Hines says:

      Thanks Ann! You should try Contently - I think it's free for writers. Just sign up for a profile and enter in all of the publications you write for. It takes a bit, but it will sift through and find your content, then summarize it for you. 🙂

  3. Kari says:

    I was just thinking about bookmarking some sites for my new niche, and you reminded me about Feedly! I need to make checking Feedly a habit so I don't forget about it again.

    As far as lessons learned in blogging, I've realized that loving your niche is a huge motivator for continuous growth and success. Unfortunately, I've fallen out of love with some of my niches, and it makes it really hard to write new posts for those blogs. I think I've tackled all the topics I want to tackle, and the thrill of gaining and giving insight in those niches is completely gone. I need to start outsourcing if I want to keep the blogs alive!

    • NicheHacks says:

      Then outsource. It's how I've kept NicheHacks alive. I hired Kristi and others to be my writing team. I've written only about 3 posts in the past 7-8 months.

    • Kristi Hines says:

      A lot of people outsource Kari, so don't feel bad about it. Even those who are the most passionate about their niche simply don't have the time to write about it anymore. Or just need a break so they can reconnect. 🙂

  4. Kristi - Excellent article! I have pontificated on all of these items (I'm hooked on the word 'pontification' after binge watching 'The West Wing' and President Bartlett's use of the word.. lol). However, I love how you present them your list is such an essential reminder! I especially like that you mention that you need to love the niche (and love writing) in order to excel. I was just saying that to my husband the other day. I do love writing (and fortunately love several different niches), but when you are tired out from all the writing, you realize that there is no way you can write another article except for that love. Also - great reminder on the feedly. Thanks, again.

    • Kristi Hines says:

      Thanks Deborah! I think that everyone can get a little disenchanted with their niche if they are producing content on a daily basis. But ultimately, if you love it, you kind of come back to it again. Sometimes you just have to step away for a few days to set off a new spark. 🙂

  5. Holger says:

    I also use Feedly for News and find Ideas for Blog Post. Great Tool & Article

    I read Email Newsletter from Kristi 😉

  6. Tommy Olsson says:

    Great post with a lot of good advice 🙂

  7. Atinuke says:

    Thanks Kristi
    I quite agree that we should not try to reinvent the wheel. And you know what? some pple just want you to organise all the info out there for them on your blog. They are not expecting you to invent a "never been heard before solution".
    Am at the point where am experiencing the writer's block. Now, I know what to do. Thanks once again.

    • Kristi Hines says:

      That's a great point. Sometime's it's not about writing something new, but helping people find the right things to read about a topic. If they trust you, they will appreciate you pointing them in the right direction.

  8. rufat says:

    Great post! It inspires me to write more and better. Really good and actionable ideas.

  9. motivated for the following lines " " Almost Everything Has Already Been Written About :O

    If you're looking for a niche where you can be the first to write a unique piece of content that has never been written about before, good luck.

    There are over 117 billion blog posts on Tumblr.

    WordPress.com users publish over 41 million blog posts per month.

    If you search for websites with blog subdomains, there are over 16 million results.

    If you search for Blogspot blogs, there are over 245 million results.

    What does that tell you? There's a good chance that almost every great idea you think about has been covered in a blog post. Likely many of them.

    You can't be discouraged by this fact. You should be motivated by it instead.

    Your goal isn't to write about something no one has ever written about before, although if you find that topic, good for you.

    Your goal is to write about it better. Your goal is to write the best post about that topic.

    If you focus on writing the most up to date, accurate, and thorough blog post, you will create amazing content each and every time you blog.""

    Thanks for sharing it.... Love You NH ... 🙂

  10. jul-akmad C. ebbah says:

    hi kristi, well explain, it's give a me a point where i start my blogging journey. keep up!

  11. Anthony/Brodojo says:

    What I am really interested in is how you actually get to the point of publishing with so many different sites. I am operating in an all male demographic and would love some tips on guest blogging outreach to get my site out there and build it into the brand I want it to be.

    Any thoughts or nuggets you can share?

  12. jeff scholz says:

    Hey Kristi,

    You mentioned solving a problem you're having and turning it into content. This post did that for me. You're comments on writing and procrastination gave me new perspective. I find creating content the most difficult part of making niche sites - but that's where the meat is!

    Thanks for the article

  13. Louie Luc says:

    Hi Kristi,

    Thanks for sharing the lessons you've learned from writing all of those blog posts with us.
    They can be really helpful. 🙂

    I suffer from the "writer's block" in the form of procrastination.
    I just keep pushing forward what I have to do (as writing) and start doing other stuff not as important or urgent as checking my mail, seeing my Google Analytics stats, etc.

    (It seems that I see the amount of work I have to do as whole and that sort of scares me. The trick is to break it into small parts and do each one at a time so it doesn't seem so daunting.)

    By the time I decide to really start working... I'm already tired of being on the computer for so long.

    Thanks again for your insight! I learned a lot from it.

    Kind Regards,
    Louie

    • Kristi Hines says:

      I always like getting tasks done, so when I started procrastinating with my writing, I didn't understand it. Then I realized it was just writer's block in a form that no one really talks about. And sometimes, you think that checking email, social, etc. is "working" when really it is just another form of procrastinating. 🙂

      • Louie Luc says:

        Doing less important tasks and calling it work... "it's just another form of procrastination". That's precisely what is is. 🙂

        I'll force myself to do those things when my real tasks are done. Someday it will become second nature to me.

  14. Yogendra says:

    Hey Kristi! You've written a great post to explain how to write a great post! Keep writing to motivate us.

  15. Jigar says:

    Loved reading the post and keep up the good work!